“QUICK” is often a magic word in our home.  I like to keep a couple of these sealed plastic pouches of ham steak slices in my freezer.  When I’m tired or just plain not in the mood to cook but everyone is expecting me to, or in a big hurry, this is a great “go-to” recipe. I yank it out of the freezer, pop it into the microwave (still in the plastic pouch) for about 1 minute; then repeat, mind you, not long or it could explode in the microwave.


The sauce is more of a glaze than a sauce.  If you want more sauce to put on rice, then double the sauce ingredients.

Quick and Tangy  HAM STEAK

1 ham steak, trimmed of most fat
Sauce:
4 T. light brown sugar
½ tsp. dry mustard powder
½ tsp. cornstarch
2 T. apple cider vinegar (white vinegar can be used)
1 T. soy sauce


If the ham steak is already cooked then put the ham steak in a 10” to 12” non-stick skillet on low heat to warm it and proceed to making the sauce.
If the ham steak is not already cooked, then cook it in a 10” to 12” non-stick skillet on medium heat until ham is done. While ham is cooking or warming, use a small bowl to mix the dry mustard and cornstarch; then slowly stir in the vinegar and soy.  Stir until completely blended.  Remove the cooked or warmed ham steak from the skillet; then pour the sauce mixture into the skillet allowing the sauce mixture to blend with any juices left in the skillet from the ham.  Cook on medium heat while stirring until sauce slightly thickens.  Place the cooked ham steak in the sauce to coat the ham; then turn ham and simmer for about 1 minute.  Turn ham steak over and simmer about 1 minute more.

This recipe is amazingly delicious given the amount of time exerted to prepare it.



LEFTOVERS:
If any ham is leftover, then it is marvelous on brown, nutty tasting artisan bread as a sandwich with a single whole leaf of Romaine lettuce. Yum.

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