MARDI GRAS Madness CAKE

Table of Contents: CAKE

 

Cake Ingredients:

2 (16-oz.) boxes white cake mix

½ cup confectioners’ sugar

3 T. rum

Fresh Pineapple

Fresh Blueberries

Fresh Kiwi Berries

 

Frosting Ingredients:

4 T. butter or margarine, softened

1 lb. confectioners’ sugar

3-4 T. Half and Half

3 T. rum

1 T. lemon juice

Mardi Gras colors sugars &/or sprinkles  (in photo I used clear & it was too light to show!)

Small tubes (.67 oz.) of decorating gels in Mardi Gras colors  (green & purple used here)

 

 

 

 

 

 

To Make Cake:

Make both white cake mixes in one bowl according to the package directions.  Bake in an 11” X 16” inch baking pan.  After the cooking time allow the cake to cool for about 10 minutes; the pierce the entire top of the cake with a fork.

 

Using the cake ingredients, stir the rum into the confectioners’ sugar until smooth; then evenly pour or spoon the mixture over the entire top of the cake for the mixture to seep into the pierced holes.  Set cake aside to allow it to completely cool.

 

Cut the pineapple and kiwi fruit into small to medium triangles to garnish the cake.

 

As cake is cooling, use an electric mixer to cream the butter or margarine with the confectioners’ sugar from the frosting ingredients.  Add 3 T. of the half and Half and continue to cream; then add 3 T. of the rum.  Continue to cream and add the lemon juice.  Only add the

additional Half and Half and/or rum as it is needed to make a good spreading consistency for the frosting.

 

To Assemble Cake:

Frost the top of the cooled cake.  The frosting will not be thick.  (If you want a thicker frosting, make the frosting recipe one and one-half times.)  Then make any design that you desire using the Mardi Gras colors fruits.  The blueberries look like the Mardi Gras beads that are

thrown from the floats.  How about a fleur-de-lis design?

 

 

Since I was born in Mobile, Alabama and still have many relatives there plus all of our children and grandchildren, we spend lots of time in Mobile, especially at Mardi Gras time.  Interestingly enough, most people don’t realize that the pre-Lenten celebration of Mardi Gras in North America was begun in 1703 in the city of Mobile, which was the capitol of French Louisiana at the time.  The Catholic celebration of Carnival or Mardi Gras was not begun in the city of New Orleans until over a decade later.

Mobile’s Mardi Gras emphasizes celebrating with families.  For over two weeks, huge, themed-floats with masked and costumed riders from the various Mardi Gras societies throw bright-colored beaded-necklaces, stuffed animals, moon pies, glow sticks, peanuts, decorated plastic cups, doubloons, etc.   The parades have marvelous sounding college and high school marching bands; old men shuffling along playing wonderful jazz; beautiful girls dancing and twirling batons in sparkling costumes; kilt-clad bagpipers playing their pipes; and fire-breathing dragons, zigzagging down the streets causing the parade-fans to scream.


After the parades, most societies have grand balls with multiple bands for dancing ‘til the early hours of the morning.  Some balls have 5,000 men dressed in their formal tails with white ties looking a little like a large colony of penguins all interspersed with beautiful women dressed in exquisite ball gowns, jewels, cleavage, and plumage.  There’s usually a queen and a king with scepters and fur-trimmed trains bedecked with jewels and sequins dazzling the crowd.  The whole two weeks prior to Lent is all quite a show and one must have a cake for one of the parties.

The two good-looking marshals with their tall, black ostrich feathers just happen to be our sons!

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