Cooking steak is truly an “art form”.  I am sure that you have been served steaks at restaurants that would not even pass for good “shoe leather”!  It is my personal feeling that unless we are planning to dine at a well-respected steak restaurant; then I had rather cook my steak at home.  However, If I’m invited to someone’s home for steak, there will be a grateful smile on my face that I’m being given a treat; and there will definitely be no complains from me!


Only 3 ingredients: Steaks, Salt, Freshly Ground Black Pepper (grind the black pepper just before beginning to cook the steaks and set aside)
Choose from either of the 2 cooking methods.

Here are a few “how to “ tips.  (Use tips 1 through 3 for both cooking methods).

First Method begins at # 4

1. Buy steaks at a meat market respected for beef quality.  Spend the money on a good grade of beef.  Select an aged tender cut of meat, such as a porterhouse, T-bone, filet mignon, N. Y. strip, Delmonico, rib-eye, or sirloin.  Have steak cut about 1 to 1 ½ inches thick
2. For outstanding pure steak flavor, do nothing to the meat (no spices, salt, sauces, marinade)
3. Remove steaks from the refrigerator and the package about ½ hour before cooking time
4. Use a gas or charcoal grill
5. When ready to cook, have the grill hot, but not flaming
6. Place steaks over direct fire on the grill, and allow outside of the steaks to sear; then pull the cover over the grill.  Watch grill for flames to prevent steaks from burning
7. Cook about 5 minutes; then turn steaks with tongs (no forks, please), and repeat the cooking process for another 5 minutes
8. Using a small, sharp knife, make a small slit in the center of the steak to test for desired doneness.  Do not pierce the meat any more than necessary.  Piercing causes the meat to lose juices
9. Remove steaks from the grill with the tongs when steaks are a slightly more red or pink in color than actually desired because the meat will continue to cook for a short time
10. Place steaks on a warm platter, and immediately sprinkle salt and freshly ground black pepper on both sides of the meat.  Do not wait even a few minutes to season, since the meat begins to seal as it cools.


This was the way my father, Tom, taught me to cook steaks.  It was his opinion, and I agree with him, that good beef does not need any additions except salt and pepper.  He thought that sauces, other spices, marinades, etc. were used to cover-up the flavor of lesser quality beef.  But, what the heck, you’re the customer and if you like a flavor other than the pure beef flavor; then use your favorite seasoning combination.  You may want to stick with one of Tom’s methods of cooking the steaks.  

Second method:
When it was too cold, too hot. raining “cats and dogs”, or no grill was available, Tom cooked steaks in an iron skillet on the stove.

Trim most of the fat or suet from the outer edge of the steak & set aside.  Then heat the iron skillet to hot, but not smoking, and tossed a piece of suet into the hot skillet.  Using a fork, quickly move the suet around the whole skillet surface, including the sides.  Remove the suet and discard.  There will be some oil in the skillet left from the suet.  Place the steaks in the hot skillet and sear on one side; then turn with tongs (no forks, please) to sear the other side.  Lower heat to medium or medium-high and continue cooking for about 4 to 5 minutes; then turn steaks and cook another 4 to 5 minutes.  Using a small, sharp knife, make a small slit in the center of the steak to test for doneness.  Do not pierce the meat any more than necessary.  Piercing causes the meat to lose juices.  Remove steaks from the skillet with the tongs when steaks are a slightly more red or pink color than actually desired because the meat will continue to cook for a short time.  Place steaks on a warm platter, and immediately sprinkle salt and freshly ground black pepper on both sides of the meat.  Do not wait even a few minutes to season, since the meat begins to seal as it cools.

 

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